navaan: (Public Call Mod)
[personal profile] navaan posting in [community profile] doctorwho


Schedule:
Nominations: 18th September - 1st October
Sign-ups: 4th - 18th October
Assignments: sent by 20th October
Deadline: 26th November
Posting period: starting 1st December

Description:
[community profile] public_call is a secret santa fic exchange for Doctor Who and its various related fandoms, run through LJ/DW and AO3. Participants sign up to write a story of at least 1,000 words involving a relationship between two or more characters someone else has requested. In return, they receive a story of at least 1,000 words with a relationship they have requested.

Nominations now open

English suites no. 1

Sep. 21st, 2017 01:55 pm
calimac: (Haydn)
[personal profile] calimac
This has been Gustav Holst's birthday, as the radio announcer kindly informed me, so it's as good a time as any to use a Holst work to launch a musical project I've been mulling for some time, which is a series of pleasant, mostly modern, suites, first by English composers and then branching out.

This is probably the best-known one I'll be presenting in the entire series, Holst's St. Paul's Suite. It's played by a student orchestra from Poland, which might account for the unusual sonority. The players are all female, appropriately, as Holst wrote the work for the students of the St. Paul's Girls' School, where he taught music for many years.

Like many of the suites to come, it's in four movements vaguely replicating sonata form, and the finale, as with many of Holst's best works, incorporates a sturdy old English folk tune.

rfmcdonald: (Default)
[personal profile] rfmcdonald

  • In this unseasonably warm September, Toronto tenants need more air conditioning than some landlords provide. The Toronto Star reports.

  • NOW Toronto notes the launch of a new Kent Monkman canvas, this one depicting a Dutch-Iroquois treaty signing.

  • The bizarre story of an ISIS supporter who tried to attack people at a Canadian Tire store is getting more bizarre. The Toronto Star reports.

  • There is a possibility the Ontario minimum wage increase could hurt employment outside of well-off Toronto. The Globe and Mail reports.

rfmcdonald: (Default)
[personal profile] rfmcdonald

  • If the separatists of Catalonia are triggering a confrontation with the Spanish government to create a majority ... Open Democracy reports.

  • Speaking as someone who could be classified as a settler himself, positioning myself and my arguments is key. MacLean's notes the importance of sensitivity to First Nations issues.

  • The United Kingdom does seem likely to get the selective access to the EU's markets post-Brexit some want. Bloomberg reports.

  • Expensive avocado exports are but some of the complications that could hit North America if NAFTA gets changed. Bloomberg reports.

  • Iceland, again, is displaying particular caution towards potentially overwhelming Chinese investment projects. Bloomberg reports.

I feel much more than 15 years older

Sep. 21st, 2017 04:55 pm
derien: It's a cup of tea and a white mouse.  The mouse is offering to buy Arthur's brain and replace it with a simple computer. (Default)
[personal profile] derien
Whelp, today those of us who've been with the organization for 15 years got pins to commemorate our... stupidity determination. We got pins, and there was cake. It's really odd how some of us just stick even though there's huge turnover in general. I don't know if those of us who started together have a sense of mission, or if we're just scared to attempt getting another job.

The main thing we're all aware of, though, is that we're now going to get even more annual leave time that we won't be able to take because of under staffing. Supposedly we're only just a little under fully staffed at the moment, but if that's true why is it so difficult to get time off?
[syndicated profile] cooltools_feed

Posted by cooltools

We have hired an editor to edit the Cool Tools podcast. It costs us $300 a month. So far, Cool Tools listeners have pledged $277 a month to the podcast. Please consider supporting us on Patreon. We have nice rewards for people who contribute! – MF

Our guest this week is Wendy Frauenfelder. Wendy likes to cook, fix things, pretend to be a bartender, and do therapy dog work. She also is fascinated with wild yeast and slow food.


Subscribe to the Cool Tools Show on iTunes | RSS | Transcript | Download MP3 | See all the Cool Tools Show posts on a single page


Show notes:


stanleystubby
Stanley 66-358 Stanley Stubby Ratcheting MultiBit Screwdriver ($10)
“I always keep a screwdriver in the kitchen, just so that I don’t have to go to the garage if I something inside the house that I need to work on. So this is my new screwdriver inside the house, and there’s a couple things I like. First, it’s small. It’s like four-and-a-half inches long, and so it fits in a junk drawer really easily. The second thing I really like about it is it’s a ratcheting screwdriver. So, if you’re fixing a knob on a cabinet or something you don’t have to spin it around in your hand, you can just kind of ratchet it in, which I love. But you can also make it just a steady, regular kind of screwdriver. Then the third thing that I love about it is you unscrew the cap on the top of the screwdriver and inside are five other tips. So you’ve got three Phillips head and three regular screwdriver tips, and they vary from pretty tiny to large and fat, and they’re right there in the cap, so you can grab your screwdriver without knowing what kind of screw you’ve gotta work on, and you’ll have the right tip.”


masonjar
24 oz Mason Drinking Jar & Stainless Steel Straw ($10.50)
“It’s actually a Ball jar, not a mason jar, and then it’s got the regular kind of screw-on lid, but whoever made this took the little flat part of the lid on top and put a rivet in it and made a hole so you can stick a straw in there. It is actually pretty waterproof. I wouldn’t say you should leave it upside down in your car, but I’ll usually put a smoothie in here, and every once in a while I’ll shake it to just kind of mix up the liquid again, and it’s doesn’t come out at all. So, it’s that waterproof. … A lot of times these will come with a metal straw, and I don’t like that because, since I drink a smoothie out of it, I’m afraid I’m never really getting that clean, so I found some straws on Amazon that fit to the bottom. It had to be an extra-long straw. It fits to the bottom of the jar, and it’s got a little bend in it, and then I just toss it when I’m done. … I just feel like glass gets really clean. And you don’t have to worry about BPAs.”


spoonstraw
GFDesign Drinking Spoon Straws ($10.50)
“I was looking at cocktail items, and this caught my eye … We started using it when I was making mojitos, and you gotta stir up a mojito, because you’ve got some granulated sugar in the bottom of it when you muddle the mint leaves. So you stir it up with this thing, and then I’m thinking, ‘This is great, because then you just leave it in there, and you sip through it.’ And if your sugar didn’t all dissolve, you can still start drinking your mojito and kind of stir it as you go along.”


buymeapie
Buy me a pie!
“I am kind of like a connoisseur of grocery shopping list apps. [This app] is actually organized by store, so I have a Whole Foods list, a Target list, and a Costco list, basically, and I can open whichever one I want, and then I can add items to whichever one I want. You can have the same item in different lists. You can have as many lists as you want if you buy the paid version. I think the free version you’re limited to maybe two or three. …What I really like about it is that you can color-code these items by grocery store area or by aisle. So everything that’s veggie is green and fruit’s green, and meat is under the red category, and cold foods are blue and frozen foods are gray. So that way, as you’re going through your list, you go to produce and you just see all the produce that you need to get is all in one section.”


SHAKESPEARE FILL #13

Sep. 21st, 2017 09:21 pm
kadma: (→ bubble pop)
[personal profile] kadma posting in [community profile] femslashficlets
Title: pretty reckless, pretty wild
Fandom: WWE
Pairing: Nikki Cross / Ruby Riot
Rating: G
Prompt: #13 - Shakespeare Quotes
Word Count: 400

Summary: Ruby hunts Nikki down.

Tired now

Sep. 21st, 2017 09:16 pm
beccaelizabeth: my Watcher tattoo in blue, plus Be in red Buffy style font (Default)
[personal profile] beccaelizabeth
Attempt to go to board games night at Waterstones unsuccessful. No board games, no dude that runs board games night, no noticeable board game night by ten past when it started, an the lady at the desk thought the guy was at the other shop today so it wouldn't happen. If it happened after quarter past starting I'll be vaguely annoyed, but, couldn't see a group identifiably hanging around waiting for games either. The knitting was there again though. Maybe I should try social knitting.

The mobile phones place in the mall made money go in my phone again. I know many people can make this happen without going to a phone shop but I heard the phone tell the guy to put in a sixteen digit number and honestly I'm fine leaving it to them twice a year. Mall wasn't otherwise very interesting.

Went to The Range to try and buy a tablecloth but there were only a couple sorts, on sale, either the color I wanted or the pattern I wanted but not both at once, or a lot of runners which are nice but not the thing. Christmas was only half unpacked, and Halloween didn't take half the space of christmas. It is very very shiny though. I didn't buy things because then they just stay in the box but if I'm still thinking of specific things next week I could pop in again.

Sainsburys had moneys off clothing but none clothes I wanted. One very soft sleep shirt I might get later but don't really need. Slippers either my size or my color. And a watch with a too big strap. But none things I wanted from the sale.

But they did have a season set of Arrow, so now I'll have all the things and can in theory get caught up :-)

Also the foods were there and the drinks and the cleaning supplies
and I remembered to check my shopping list before we left so I could go back for the laundry whatsits.

Basically a success.

Well I did my half, anyways.

Now I'm very tired and looking forwards to staying home for a week.

Utterly lost in translation

Sep. 21st, 2017 07:37 pm
[syndicated profile] languagelog_feed

Posted by Geoffrey K. Pullum

During a search for something else, I happened upon this page at the Bible Study Tools site. It provides a nice reminder (for the two or three people out there who might still need it) of the fact that it's dangerous to trust websites, in linguistic matters or in anything else. As the screenshot shows, it purports to show Psalm 86 in two parallel versions, the Latin Vulgate and the New International Version.

"Filiis Core psalmis cantici fundamenta eius in montibus sanctis" is translated as "Hear me, Lord, and answer me, for I am poor and needy." The correct translation is debatable, but the first four words mean "A song psalm for the sons of Korah", and the rest means either "Its foundations are in the sacred hills" or (according to the Revised Standard Version) "On the holy mount stands the city he founded." Verse 2, "Diligit dominus portas Sion super omnia tabernacula Iacob" (roughly, "The Lord loves the gates of Sion more than all the dwellings of Jacob") is translated as "Guard my life, for I am faithful to you; save your servant who trusts in you. You are my God." The third verse begins Gloriosa dicta sunt ("glorious things are spoken") but is translated as "have mercy on me". This is worse than the worst botch I ever saw from Google Translate. And I suspect human error is to blame.

They've got the wrong psalm, having fallen foul of the discrepancy between the Hebrew (Masoretic) and Greek (Septuagint/Vulgate) numberings. They have aligned the Latin of Psalm 87 in the Hebrew numbering (86 in the Greek) with the English of the Hebrew Psalm 86 (Greek 85). The Authorized Version of the bible (1611) uses the Hebrew numbering, as does the Revised Standard Version (1951). Catholic authorities (see Rosary Bay's parallel Latin-English psalter, for example) use the Greek numbering, having (correctly) recognized that psalms 9 and 10 in the Hebrew numbering are two parts of a single psalm. The error on the Bible Tools site goes on, of course, to affect all psalms from 10 (in the Greek numbering) onwards.

The psalm that begins "Fundamenta eius in montibus sanctis" turns up in certain magical spells and incantations, so the error could turn out to have rather serious consequences. For example, in section 110 of Claude Lecouteux's The Book of Grimoires: The Secret Grammar of Magic it is recommended that an inscription of the Fundamenta eius psalm written, in pigeon blood together with certain magical characters (which do not have Unicode numbers, so I will not try to reproduce them here), if smoked over mastic and aloe wood and then attached to your right arm, will preserve your health and cause your business affairs to prosper.

Catching a pigeon, subduing it, and draining its blood into a bowl left my kitchen in a bit of a mess, but once the gory stuff was done, and I had enough blood to moisten my quill pen, it didn't take long to complete the necessary scribal job. I sewed the piece of parchment into the lining of the right arm of my jacket, and haven't looked back since. I don't leave home without it. It has made me healthy and prosperous, exactly as was guaranteed.

But you do have to be able to tell one psalm from another if you want to get your spells right. So don't put your trust in just any old site you find on the web when looking for translations of documents. It could lead you even further astray than a random condo development brochure about armed structure and crystals.

Oh, Sam!

Sep. 21st, 2017 01:08 pm
semyaza: (Samwise the Brave)
[personal profile] semyaza
This is the 80th anniversary of The Hobbit!

Elsewhere on my feed:

Britain's Head Gardeners.

Letter to my Senators

Sep. 21st, 2017 03:12 pm
lydy: (Default)
[personal profile] lydy

Dear Senator,

 

I know you have fought, again and again, for the ACA.  Thank you.  Please continue to fight.

 

Allow me to tell you about my personal situation.  I am fifty-five, female, and employed.  When I was a child, I was diagnosed with asthma.  These days, I’m mostly fine.  I have a rescue inhaler, but rarely need it.  But that diagnosis is a pre-existing condition.  That means that, if the Graham-Cassidy bill goes through, I could be denied coverage.  When I was in my thirties, I was diagnosed with major depressive disorder and bipolar disorder.  I was treated, and am currently just fine; I no longer even need drugs to manage this condition.  It is even possible that the diagnosis was not entirely correct.  However, that diagnosis is in my medical chart, and therefore a pre-existing condition.  Therefore, I could be denied coverage.  When I was thirty-five, I was diagnosed with obstructive sleep apnea.  I have a CPAP machine which I use nightly.  It won’t last forever.  I need to replace the mask at least once every six months.  This is a pre-existing condition, and I could be denied coverage.  Any one of these conditions could kill me.  Any one of these conditions could mean that I can be denied coverage.  And not just denied coverage for this condition, but denied coverage at all.  This has happened to me before.  When I lost my job, no insurance company would offer me any coverage at all, because of the bi-polar diagnosis.  I was fortunate enough to live in Minnesota, which offered Minnesota Care.  Not every state has such programs. 

 

The holy grail, according to the Republicans, for health coverage is “choice.”  As if I, or most people, have ever had any real choice.  I get my insurance through my employer, who negotiates with an insurance company, and those negotiations don’t include me or my interests.  I may be offered a “choice” of tiers.  When my employer and the company they have contracted with parts ways, no amount of pleading will allow me to keep my doctor.  I will be subjected to transitioning care to whoever it is that my employer has contracted with this year.  This has happened to me over and over and over again throughout my working life.  The claim that the ACA has reduced choice is laughable.  Most of us have had no choice, anyway.  What it provided, what it guaranteed, was access.  I might prefer to see the doctor I have been seeing, sure, but I _need_ to be able to see a doctor.    I have preferences, yes, but access is much more important.

 

Health insurance isn’t like car insurance.  I can choose to pay a minimum amount to cover my old beater, because quite honestly, if it’s in an accident, there’s not much point in fixing it.  This is not true of my body.  I can’t just write off my aging body as not worth fixing.  I can’t decide to buy a new, better body.  Still, we are required to buy car insurance, if not for ourselves, for the people we might hurt if we run into them.  And in this sense, there is a similarity between health insurance and car insurance.  Health insurance means that I can afford to get vaccinated, and treated for serious, contagious diseases such as tuberculosis.  And that protects everyone I come in contact with, including those who are too young, or in too fragile health to get vaccinations.  This is important, and necessary, for all of us.  I really don’t want to die of bacterial pneumonia, and neither do you.  I don’t want to watch a generation of children be crippled by polio, or die of scarlet fever.  And yet, when you strip away the ability to get health care from the poor, this becomes a very real danger. 

 

Please continue to fight.  Please feel free to share any of the details of this letter with your colleagues or anyone else in this fight for my life. 

 

****

Sigh.  My senators are Franken and Klobuchar.  Maybe they can wave their numbers in someone else's face.  

I really don't want to die.  Why do the Republicans want to kill me?

rj_anderson: (Doctor Who - Thing in Progress)
[personal profile] rj_anderson
[Crossposted from Facebook, feel free to ignore if you've already seen it there...]

Well into the second week of working on a new short story, and enjoying the writing process more than I have for a long time.

It's taken me eighteen months on sabbatical to get over the deeply ingrained habit of checking every few minutes to see how many words I've written, of feeling anxious that it's taking so long to get through a particular scene, of worrying that my time and effort has been wasted if I end up having to cut some or all of what I've written and start over the next day. Not to mention the voice of my Inner Editor nagging, "That scene is boring! That description is sappy! That conversation doesn't advance the plot! Nobody's going to like this. Give up and write something else."

It's not that I don't care anymore about making progress, or writing the best story I can. I'm just not measuring my work by the same rigid, merciless standards that used to suck away all the pleasure of writing for me. I don't have an outline for this story, just a vague notion of where I want it to end up and a few scattered ideas about how to get there -- and that's fine. I don't know who the audience for this story will be, or where I'm going to publish it once it's finished -- and that's fine, too. I'm writing it because I want to, not for the money or the market or the fear of losing my career if I don't. And that's the best feeling of all.

But it's taken me all this time to get there, because I drove myself so hard for so long, running on fear and guilt and sheer bloodyminded determination, that I couldn't remember how to write any other way.

Creative burnout is a real thing, ladies and gentlemen. Don't let it happen to you.

sheesh

Sep. 21st, 2017 02:48 pm
chazzbanner: (painted tower)
[personal profile] chazzbanner
I got a couple of birthday cards from staff members, and when I sent an email thanks I sent it to the grad student listserv! (a number of them then emailed me to say happy birthday).

j-wat gave me a book on Minnesota caves. He was worried about whether I already had it - but I didn't. :-)

Oh damn, accountant came in and I have to think about work.

-

(no subject)

Sep. 21st, 2017 12:44 pm
shyfoxling: fox in a witch's hat and Ravenclaw colors scarf with a wand and shiny swirly bits (general (shyfoxling))
[personal profile] shyfoxling
I see that someone has nominated last year's TV series of Dirk Gently's Holistic Detective Agency for [community profile] yuletide. That could be interesting, if anyone takes it up.

(wow, it's within 1 character of tag length limit!)

Criminal Fiction: killer podcasts

Sep. 21st, 2017 12:00 pm
[syndicated profile] seattlereviewofbooks_feed

Every month, Daneet Steffens uncovers the latest goings on in mystery, suspense, and crime fiction. See previous columns on the Criminal Fiction archive page

Photo credit: Paul Reich. L to R: Veste, Billingham, Dolan, Rankin, Neville, Cavanagh.

Kudos to Denise Mina for winning Bloody Scotland’s McIlvanney Prize for the best Scottish Crime book of the year. Her terrific The Long Drop is a beautifully-paced, novelistic slice of 1950s Glasgow, as well as an astute re-imagining of a real-life crime that riveted the city (and, to some extent, still does). Cheekier kudos are due to the Two Crime Writers and A Microphone podcasters Steve Cavanagh and Luca Veste, and their festival live-event featuring a cast of crime-fiction gold: Ian Rankin, Eva Dolan, Mark Billingham, and Stuart Neville. Catch the hilarious, expletive-strewn outcome here, with episode 47.

Reading around: new titles on the crime fiction scene

Sophie Hannah excels at slightly paranoid, overly imaginative, furiously curious women who inevitably land themselves in piping-hot water, and, in Keep Her Safe (William Morrow), Cara Burrows is no exception. Off on a furtive, two-week jaunt to a flash Arizona resort, the British Burrows, jet-lagged and on-edge, checks in to her hotel, only to find the room she’s been given is already occupied. Within a matter of hours, Burrows has a bizarre — and top-notch — mystery on her hands: based on what she’s seen in that hotel room, is America’s most famous murder victim actually alive, well and vacationing in Arizona? Hannah’s fully fleshed-out characters and obvious relish for the outrageous tides and sweeps of contemporary media culture fuel this page-turner, while her joy of puzzles quietly contributes its soul.

The British Secret Service game is strong in John le Carré’s A Legacy of Spies (Viking). Bookending some of the action of 1963’s The Spy Who Came in From the Cold as well as sharing critical characters with 1974’s Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy, Legacy is narrated by Peter Guillam, close colleague of George Smiley. It appears that some of the Circus’ long-ago spy shenanigans have caught up with them in the present day, and Guillam, summoned to the offices of MI6 from his cozy retirement homestead in Brittany, has some explaining to do. It’s a testament to the ugliness of the current political landscape – which le Carré has fearlessly and vocally addressed in recent novels — that re-visiting the old-school days of a Western intelligence agency provides pure, escapist fun, despite the amoral, duplicitous and exploitative machinations of the agents.

Already in semi-hot water as a witness in a grand-jury proceeding, Darren Mathews, black Texas Ranger, finds himself fully immersed when an FBI pal sends him to check out two homicides in the tiny town of Lark, East Texas. Attica Locke’s terrific Bluebird, Bluebird (Mulholland) simmers with racial tensions, shimmers with unforgiving heat, features a killer soundtrack playing in the background, and offers an early sentence that echoes perpetually throughout the book: “In the wake of Obama, America had told on itself.” But within Bluebird’s deeply atmospheric surround is a story driven by entirely human, individualistic elements — love, fear, entitlement, jealousy — a story told with Locke’s crystal-clear vision and pleasurably elemental prose.

The temptation to stray is, well, tempting in Andrea Camilleri’s A Nest of Vipers (trans. Stephen Sartarelli; Penguin), when Inspector Montalbano is faced with a proper femme fatale while investigating his latest case — the murder of the woman’s father, no less. No sooner has his long-suffering girlfriend, Livia, jetted back home to Genoa, when a dinner invitation-proposal throws him (only temporarily) for a loop. Both fascinated and repulsed by the murder victim who had no qualms about blackmailing and loan sharking an extensive community, Montalbano, true to form, mulls over clues, red herrings and eurekas alike while ingesting the best food Sicily has to offer. Deceptively bordering on cozy, Camilleri’s mysteries never shy away from concealing a dark-black element at their heart.

The Quintessential Interview: JA Jance

J.A. Jance’s Seattle PI J.P. Beaumont has been on the murder-solving scene since 1985’s Until Proven Guilty, Jance’s first detective novel. Since then, Jance has kept her scores of books band-box-fresh and her prose moving along at a peppy pace. In her latest, Proof of Life, the depth of Beaumont’s career provides rich fodder for the current mystery as now-retired Beaumont finds himself embroiled in the supposedly-accidental death of retired reporter and part-time nemesis Maxwell Cole.

What or who are your top five writing inspirations?

I have no idea! Not only do I not have five — I don’t have one!

Top five places to write?

In my gazebo in the back yard. On the back porch overlooking the garden. In my chair in the family room. On my patio in Tucson. On a cruise ship.

Top five favorite authors?

Jussi Adler-Olsen. Ann B Ross. Lee Child. Daniel Silva. Jo Nesbø.

Top five tunes to write to?

“Crazy” by Patsy Cline. “At Seventeen” by Janis Ian. Mozart’s The Magic Flute. Anything by Anne Murray. Anything by Gentleman Jim Reeves.

Top five hometown spots?

Tea at the Georgian at the Fairmont Olympic. The 5th Avenue Theatre. TechCity Bowl. John Howie Steak. Bridle Trails Red Apple in Kirkland.

Equinox

Sep. 21st, 2017 12:39 pm
bubbleblower: cropped head shot of me with nebula background (Default)
[personal profile] bubbleblower
As I post this we have about a day to go until the Equinox, when the Sun will cross from the sign of Virgo (Tropical horoscope system) to Libra. This will happen Friday (September 22) at about 1:02 pm California time (4:02 pm on the US East Coast, 8:02 pm UTC ("Greenwich"), and so on into Saturday (September 23) in Asia and Australia).

The Sun also crosses the Equator from North to South at this time.

As usual, Wikipedia has something to say:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Equinox

The figure at

http://www.plergb.com/Analemma/Analemma.shtml

shows the Sun's position on its journey through the signs of the Zodiac. It's updated hourly (but not on the hour). You can look at it year-round even if I only post about it at Equinoxes and Solstices.

"Culture Clash" by Jb (T)

Sep. 21st, 2017 03:08 pm
marzipan77: (Default)
[personal profile] marzipan77 posting in [community profile] stargateficrec
Show: SG-1
Rec Category: Team
Characters: Jack O'Neill, Daniel Jackson, Samantha Carter, Teal'c
Categories: Gen, Hurt/Comfort, Early Team
Author's Journal: [personal profile] sg1jb 
Link: archiveofourown.org/works/521545
Why This Must Be Read: A classic early team story where someone is hurt and lost and the earnest Captain, the cranky Colonel, and the somewhat confused Jaffa come together to rescue him. Yes, it's the one with the ducks.

snippet )
jesse_the_k: Knitted red heart pulses larger within green and blue square (Beating heart of love GIF)
[personal profile] jesse_the_k
Thanks to a [personal profile] liv-triggered happy rabbit-hole I just read Marissa Lingen's fabulous post illuminating why most people find the experience of impairment so mystifying.

AND YOU MUST READ IT TOO!

http://mrissa.dreamwidth.org/720690.html

if you need convincing: an excerpt )
yhlee: snowflake (StoryNexus: snowflake)
[personal profile] yhlee
[Note: I used Cheris and Jedao as my playtest characters when working on Winterstrike, a StoryNexus game I wrote for Failbetter Games.]

"I can't believe you didn't think it was worth telling me that we're living inside a game," Jedao was saying.

Cheris sighed. "I didn't tell you," she said, "because you wouldn't be able to shut up about it, and it's hard being a good playtest character when someone keeps ranting." cut for Ninefox spoilers, I guess? )

Write Every Day, Day 21

Sep. 21st, 2017 07:44 pm
shopfront: Source: Veronica Mars. Veronica, head on hands, hunched, black room, defeated. (VM - can this possibly get any worse?)
[personal profile] shopfront
Household has graduated from poor sleep to full blown respiratory infections complete with coughing all night and sleeping even less. So no words, and if there's no post tomorrow look for a catch up post on the weekend when I'm hopefully less ill. /o\

Tally
Days 1-15 )
Day 16: [personal profile] alexseanchai, [personal profile] auroracloud, [personal profile] cornerofmadness, [personal profile] esteliel, [personal profile] fangirlishness, [personal profile] navaan, [personal profile] ofmonstrouswords, [personal profile] shopfront, [personal profile] sylvanwitch, [personal profile] trobadora, [personal profile] ysilme (11/18)
Day 17: [personal profile] alexseanchai, [personal profile] auroracloud, [personal profile] cornerofmadness, [personal profile] esteliel, [personal profile] fangirlishness, [personal profile] miss_morland, [personal profile] navaan, [personal profile] ofmonstrouswords, [personal profile] schneefink, [personal profile] shopfront, [personal profile] st_aurafina, [personal profile] sylvanwitch, [personal profile] trobadora, [personal profile] ysilme (14/18)
Day 18: [personal profile] alexseanchai, [personal profile] auroracloud, [personal profile] cornerofmadness, [personal profile] esteliel, [personal profile] fangirlishness, [personal profile] miss_morland, [personal profile] navaan, [personal profile] ofmonstrouswords, [personal profile] shopfront, [personal profile] st_aurafina, [personal profile] sylvanwitch, [personal profile] trobadora (12/18)
Day 19: [personal profile] alexseanchai, [personal profile] auroracloud, [personal profile] cornerofmadness, [personal profile] miss_morland, [personal profile] navaan, [personal profile] ofmonstrouswords, [personal profile] shopfront, [personal profile] st_aurafina, [personal profile] sylvanwitch, [personal profile] trobadora (10/18)
Day 20: [personal profile] alexseanchai, [personal profile] auroracloud, [personal profile] cornerofmadness, [personal profile] esteliel, [personal profile] navaan, [personal profile] sylvanwitch, [personal profile] trobadora (7/18)

Let me know if you forgot to check in and need me to add you to the tally! And new people are welcome to join us at any time, if you wrote today just hop into the comments.

To Hell in a Handbasket

Sep. 21st, 2017 06:37 pm
aldersprig: (Aldersprig Leaves Raining)
[personal profile] aldersprig
It was a very nice basket, Yeri had to admit.

It was pretty, well-woven, and tidy, and it was just large enough that he could fit in it.  Not particularly a hand-basket, if you were really going to think about the term as such.

Then again, most baskets were not man-sized, most baskets did not have lids, and most of them did not have wheels. 

read on…
aldersprig: (AylaSmile)
[personal profile] aldersprig
Chapter 46: Arnbjörg
by Lyn Thorne-Alder


She was trying, she really was.  

She wasn’t trying, perhaps, as hard as she ought to or as often as she ought to, but Arnbjörg was trying hard to accept this place.  It was just...

“It’s so fucked up.”  She threw up her hands.

“What?”  Jaya turned to look at her. They were studying together on their bed, Jaye’s head on Arnbjörg’s shoulder.  They hadn’t been talking at all; Arnbjörg had been glaring at her textbook and attempting to focus.

“This school.  Everything about it.  Babies.”

read on...

Talapoin Monkey

Sep. 21st, 2017 06:00 pm
guppiecat: (Default)
[personal profile] guppiecat

Talapoin Monkey_1


The zoo called this a “talapoin”, but there are two species of talapoins, the Angolan and the Gabon. Not knowing what made them different, I went a-searchin and came across the following claim:


“Unlike the related Angolan talapoin, the Gabon talapoin has flesh-coloured (not blackish) ears and facial skin.” (from The Kingdon Guide to African Mammals, by way of Wikipedia)


Now maybe it’s just me, but it seems that the ears and facial skin or any monkey, whatever they look, would be flesh-coloured.


Crayola’s got a lot to answer for.




Originally posted at stories.starmind.org.

Namibia, Nambia, whatever

Sep. 21st, 2017 05:05 pm
[syndicated profile] languagelog_feed

Posted by Mark Liberman

It's hard to keep all those African countries straight, as President Trump demonstrated in a speech to African leaders at the U.N.:

Mr. Trump continues to create jobs in broadcast comedy, even for workers normally employed in other industries:


Of course this speech error provided opportunities for the professionals as well:

And plenty of opportunities for piece-workers on twitter:

https://twitter.com/JuliusGoat/status/910588471751925760

Here's the original:

I like political humor as much as anyone, but still, I hope that Trumpistic speech errors don't turn into this decade's version of "Bushisms".

[syndicated profile] openculture_feed

Posted by Dan Colman

Roxana Küwen is a German-born circus artist who "likes to take her audience into her world and make them be astonished, confused or amazed by playing with categories and presence." Witness the video above, where Küwen does something quite simple. She puts her feet next to her hands and moves her 20 digits in unison. Familiar body parts are put into strange motion, leaving you feeling charmed. But also a bit disconcerted.

Then Roxana starts her foot juggling routine. It's not the most high velocity, risk-filled juggling act. The balls move slowly and never get more than a few feet off of the ground. There's a strange simplicity to it, though captivating nonetheless. 

Related Content

Watch Alexander Calder Perform His “Circus,” a Toy Theatre Piece Filled With Amazing Kinetic Wire Sculptures

Watch Marcel Marceau Mime The Mask Maker, a Story Created for Him by Alejandro Jodorowsky (1959)

How Marcel Marceau Started Miming to Save Children from the Holocaust

Circus Artist Roxana Küwen Will Captivate You with Her Foot Juggling Routine is a post from: Open Culture. Follow us on Facebook, Twitter, and Google Plus, or get our Daily Email. And don't miss our big collections of Free Online Courses, Free Online Movies, Free eBooksFree Audio Books, Free Foreign Language Lessons, and MOOCs.

Sale: Mother of Souls ebook

Sep. 21st, 2017 05:21 pm
[syndicated profile] alpennia_feed

Posted by Heather Rose Jones

Thursday, September 21, 2017 - 10:21

Bella Books is holding one of its periodic surprise sales. This time the theme is relatively recent ebooks, so if you haven't gotten around to buying Mother of Souls yet (yes, I'm secretly tapping my foot impatiently) it's only $5.99 through this weekend. Plenty of other bargains as well!

Major category: 
Publications: 

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

Sep. 21st, 2017 01:10 pm
rfmcdonald: (Default)
[personal profile] rfmcdonald

  • Centauri Dreams considers the idea of dispatching a fleet of sail-equipped probes to map the asteroid belt.

  • Crux considers the importance of the invention of zero for mathematics.

  • D-Brief notes that Scotland's oldest snow patch is set to melt imminently.

  • The Dragon's Gaze links to a paper looking at the stability of multiplanetary systems in star clusters.

  • Imageo notes the modest recovery of icecaps in the Arctic this summer.

  • Language Log notes the importance of Kazakhstan's shift to using the Latin script for the Kazakh language.

  • The LRB Blog reports on a writer's visit to Helsinki.

  • The Map Room Blog notes a giant relief map of Guatemala, built to reinforce claims to what is now Belize.

  • The NYR Daily considers the continued salience of race in the fragile liberal-democratic world, in America and Europe.

  • The Power and the Money's Noel Maurer wonders if the heavy-handed Spanish government is trying to trigger Catalonian independence.

  • Roads and Kingdoms considers the palm wine of Senegal, and its vendors.

  • Understanding Society considers the Holocaust, as an experience sociological and otherwise.

  • The Volokh Conspiracy makes a libertarian case for open borders.

  • Whatever's John Scalzi celebrates his meeting mutual fan Alison Moyet.

  • Window on Eurasia notes how Belarus' cautious Belarusianization is met by Russia's pro-Soviet nostalgia.

Etymologicon, by Mark Forsyth

Sep. 21st, 2017 04:47 pm
[syndicated profile] nwhyte_feed
Second paragraph of third chapter:
Take generous: the word originally meant well-born, and because it was obvious that well-bred people were magnanious and peasants were stingy, it came to mean munificent. Indeed, the well-bred gentleman established such a reputation for himself that the word gentle, meaning soft, was named after him. In fact, some gentlemen that the gin in gingerly is probably just another gen lurking in our language. Gingerly certainly has nothing to do with ginger.
A somewhat rambly book of etymologies, with some interesting nuggets (eg usages from Coverdale's Bible) but priding itself on having no real overall structure. Probably better for dipping into than trying to read as a single work.

This was the top unread book I acquired in 2015. Next on that list is Wolf in White Van, by John Darnielle.

Lucifer (TV) - Devil in her heart

Sep. 21st, 2017 07:05 pm
prisca: (div. FF - Luzifer)
[personal profile] prisca posting in [community profile] 100words
Title: Devil in her heart
Amnesty round: #56 song titles 2 = The Beatles // Devil in her heart
Fandom: Lucifer (TV) // Chloe Decker
Rating: PG13
Disclaimer: of course, I don't own Lucifer, nor the characters

Read more... )
[syndicated profile] seattlereviewofbooks_feed

I try not to give Birth Movies Death any web traffic these days due to the noxious way the site's owner protected former BMD editor Devin Faraci in the wake of sexual assault accusations. But it's impossible for me to separate my viewing of Kingsman: The Golden Circle from a 2015 essay on the original Kingsman film by Film Crit Hulk.

I found the first Kingsman movie to be boorish and awkward in its handling of James Bond satire, though I did appreciate the way the film addressed the inherent classism of the Bond mythos. Hulk's essay didn't necessarily convince me to reappraise Kingsman as a brilliant work of art, but he did argue that the filmmaker, Matthew Vaughn, knew exactly what he was doing with the film: that Vaughn was producing, essentially, the world's only honest blockbuster movie — one that embraced the political discomfort of Bond movies.

Kingsman, of course, is adapted from a comic book series written by Mark Millar, an amoral dolt who has lowest-common-denominatored his way to great success. (I wrote about Millar in this space not so long ago.) Vaughn has taken the basics of Millar's premise — what if a poor kid became the next James Bond? — and made all the class issues entirely overt. Young Eggsy (a charismatic Taron Edgerton) is a chav who gets recruited by a Bond-like agent (Colin Firth, clearly having a lot of fun) to join a secret organization of spies who defend England from outsize global villains.

Despite a few missteps, (Samuel L. Jackson offers maybe his worst performance since Frank Miller's Spirit adaptation) even the most skeptical viewers had to admit that Kingsman was entertaining as hell, a skosh of R-rated blockbuster ultraviolence to while away time in the multiplex.

The Golden Circle will likely not invite a high level of investigation from writers like Film Crit Hulk. It is, to put it bluntly, a bad movie. It's boring and it's weighed down with exposition and the attempts at humor don't land successfully. If the first film was a sly investigation of class, the second film can't even convincingly sell itself as an investigation of how awful sequels usually are.

Of course, parts of The Golden Circle work really well: Vaughn's action sequences are buttery-smooth and boundlessly fun to watch. Julianne Moore, as the breathlessly chipper drug-dealing villain, is fantastic. Her character's plans to change the world are more interesting than your standard movie bad-guy dreck. Edgerton and Firth maintain their excellent rapport from the first film.

But most of The Golden Circle is self-serious and overblown. Channing Tatum shows up for about ten minutes of screentime, total. Some of the action sequences feel weirdly weightless. Other scenes fail to keep the plot moving forward. I have a hard time picturing any serious claim that The Golden Circle is another showcase of Vaughn's sly satirical skills. The class elements of the first film have basically disappeared, and the Bond nods feel less playful and more obligatory.

The Golden Circle is one of those rare sequels that actively diminishes the film that came before it. It's a film that's just as dumb as the comic that inspired it.

NS: It's Marvel, Baby!

Sep. 21st, 2017 05:50 pm
deh_tommy: (Lex Luthor)
[personal profile] deh_tommy posting in [community profile] scans_daily
After all the hype and worries, MARVEL vs. Capcom is back with MARVEL vs. Capcom: Infinite! Has anyone here had a chance to play the game yet? If so, what do you think of said game so far?

The Faculty // Prospects

Sep. 21st, 2017 06:43 pm
prisca: (F-Zeke-Microscope)
[personal profile] prisca posting in [community profile] 100words
Title: Prospects
Amnesty round: #56 song titles 2 = The Beatles // Bad Boys
Fandom: The Faculty // Zeke Tyler, Casey Connor
Rating: PG13
Disclaimer: of course, I don't own The Faculty, nor the characters

Read more... )
typographer: Me on a car in the middle of nowhere, eastern Colorado, age four (Default)
[personal profile] typographer
Since I wrote about the Nazi getting punched yesterday, I thought I was through, but a lot of people have been sharing a tweet that says, “I want to live in a world where people wearing Nazi symbols and people wearing rainbows can do so without being attacked.” And oh, I have so many responses to this. The first is that this is the mother of all false equivalents. When queer people and their allies where rainbows, they are saying “everyone deserves to live free of unfair discrimination no matter their sexual orientation and gender identity.” That is it. When a person wears a swastika...

(The rest of this post is at FontFolly.Net.)

OTW Guest Post: Henry Jenkins

Sep. 21st, 2017 11:06 am
otw_staff: 'Comms' and 'Claudia' written beneath the OTW Logo (Claudia)
[personal profile] otw_staff posting in [community profile] otw_news
Banner by caitie of an OTW-themed guest access lanyard



“News of the OTW bubbled up from many directions at once, most likely through my associations with Escapade, but also through an academic colleague whose partner at the time was involved. I was so excited to hear about the emergence of this fan advocacy network which brought together fannish lawyers willing to help protect our fair use rights as fans; fan scholars publishing their work through a peer-reviewed journal; fan programmers using their skills in support of the community; and of course, an archive where fans controlled what happened to their own works without the interference of web 2.0 interests.

Each of these things is important on its own terms, but taken together, this organization has been a transformative force, in all senses of the words, for fans and their rights to participate.”

For our anniversary Henry Jenkins talks fan studies, students, fandom changes over the years & why it's worth fighting for: http://goo.gl/fm19m5

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Thursday boring report

Sep. 21st, 2017 11:36 am
jhetley: (Default)
[personal profile] jhetley

Asters and goldenrod, goldenrod and asters, with patches of chicory. I may have seen a late-blooming St. Johns-wort or yellow loosestrife.

Roadkill limited to a chipmunk, one gray squirrel, and a fall warbler that won't make the migration.

Windy, cool, got out on the bike. Did not die. Ride takes me to 1100 miles for the year.

15.27 miles, 1:16:15

BC Per-Vote Subsidy

Sep. 21st, 2017 08:19 am
penlessej: (The Good Fight)
[personal profile] penlessej
I wrote more about it here on Parliament.Blog. The fact is that I do not think that casting a vote should be tied to donating any amount of money to a political party. The fact is that contributing financially to a political party is a specific form of expression that is part of the civil democratic process. By linking my vote (which has nothing to do with a desire to financially support a political party), the government is removing an aspect of my freedom of expression. As I said in the editorial, I doubt a lot of people who voted NDP or Liberal in the last BC election would translate that vote into giving $2.50 to the party. Heck the same was true in the last federal election here in Canada and I would wager for the United States during their previous Presidential Election.

HorganPerVote1

HorganPerVote2

A lot of people are bumbling over this about the taxation. It is estimated to cost $27-million by the end of 2022 when the per-vote subsidy would be down to $1.75/vote and the whole programme will be reviewed. I do not think that taxation piece is really the big issue here however. Premier Horgan is saying that the parties needs the measure to weather the changes in the interim, but I find that to be a weak argument especially because it means he is essentially saying that the fundraising reality in BC is that a political party can either depend in unethical big money or government handouts with no middle ground; but there is a middle ground, it is called grassroots engagement. A political party that cannot build a base to support itself financially (or otherwise) should not exist in a democracy.

Groo - Friends and Foes #1 (2015)

Sep. 21st, 2017 10:28 am
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[personal profile] riddler13 posting in [community profile] scans_daily
"Each month of this yearlong series, Groo and his faithful pooch, Rufferto, encounter a different acquaintance--or enemy--with the usual dire consequences! In #1, Groo crosses paths with Captain Ahax, the seaman with the world record for most ships sunk by the all-time stupidest character in comics! Brought to you by the award-winning team of Sergio Aragonés and Mark Evanier!"

The plot revolves around a little girl, Kayli, who is looking for her father - a member of the Groo cast (fortunately for her, it's not him). She stumbles upon Groo and they travel along while he wreaks havoc unintentionally.



Seaman *snickers* )

Daily Reading (21st September)

Sep. 21st, 2017 11:21 pm
ironed_orchid: (newsflash)
[personal profile] ironed_orchid posting in [community profile] bitesizedreading
What have you been reading today? Everything counts, from the user's manual to the back of the cereal box!

oh Hillary

Sep. 21st, 2017 07:25 am
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[personal profile] calimac
In the airport, waiting for my flight out, I wandered into the bookstore to see what there was to read, and saw the newly-released Hillary Clinton memoir, What Happened (this was last Thursday, and the official publication had been that Tuesday).

Excellent. This was my chance to register my vote against those who had been declaring that she should keep silent and disappear. So I bought a copy, and read it on the trip. Now B. has it.

Anyone who says that the author blames everyone but herself hasn't read the book. She takes on a full measure of responsibility and owns up to some specific mistakes, as well as to some decisions that might have been mistakes or not (like not calling out Trump when he stalked her onstage), because who knows how it would have come out if she'd done differently?

But, you know, 'it takes a village' and Comey and the feckless media deserve their share of blame too. (And if defeating Trump should have been a slam dunk, then why couldn't Jeb, Mario, Ted, or any of the rest of that gang do it? Especially after all the pleadings to suspend the rules and do it?) In fact, the only people whom Clinton doesn't blame at all are her staffers.

Which points to the problem with the book, which is that, while Clinton may be willing to own up to having committed faults, I don't think she really understands what they are. Too much of her defense consists of demonstrating that she tried hard, as if that amounted to doing a good job (the "A for effort as a final grade" fallacy). Nor does she seem to be able to think of appropriate sound bites to respond to attacks. She was flustered by the quoting out of context of the "putting coal miners out of work" line, so why didn't she respond by putting it back in context by simply repeating the next line of the original speech, which amounted to therefore we must take care of these people?

Like the policy wonk she is, Clinton spends a lot of the book diving into specifics of proposals, which is fine; but, like Obama too often, she lacks aspiration, stars to steer by, goals that may be unreachable but that at least you aim for. That's what gives people hope, and gives them the energy to work for the lesser, practical goals that are actually achievable. Bernie Sanders understands this, and that's what generated enthusiasm. Electing a woman shatters a barrier but isn't a substitute for this.

There'll be plenty of time to move on to the next thing. But as historians, we need to understand where we've been and how we got there. This is a start.

(no subject)

Sep. 21st, 2017 05:47 pm
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[personal profile] hagar_972
Rewatching this episode was a surprise. A real nice surprise. I remembered this episode as campy and difficult to take seriously: I mean, it's the one with the gay, hippy space vikings in purple furs. Instead, I discovered an episode that's really fucking serious (pun half-intended, given this episode), and just happens to have two light-and-camp moments that are, apparently, really fucking distracting.

That said, sadly this show's tendency to cast darker men for throwaway antagonist/villain roles is still here, and I still decidedly don't appreciate it.

Thematic statement of the episode: Pree's "We'll see if [Gared] survives Basic Training" and Dutch's "Welcome to Level 5. No more pulling punches."

...though on the matter of that latter one, exactly how did Dutch miss out that Johnny's the guy who'll take a plasma torch to someone's face at point blank and send a bolt through their head from across the room? And that was S1! Level 5 just means he's cleared to take kill warrants, not that he's obligated to take them: it's a matter of skill, not constitution. Which makes me think possibly the reason she rank-blocked him was to lower the chances that he'll take off on his own, which: Dutch, seriously, come the fuck on.

Ironic statement of the episode: Turin saying "If they swore our oath, I've got their backs. Even the assholes get a fair shake; that's the way I lead." Yeah, we know how that one ends when tested.

Other moment of interest: When Kendry establishes a link with the Green, she asks "What is this?" to which Aneela replies, "The beginning." Given the open/close of s03e10... yeah. If I had more patience, I'd go and fish out the images that flash when Kendry establishes said connection; that might help with figuring out if there really is a connection, or if it's window-display only.

Oh! And this time I caught the label of Zeph's petry dish: that's Khlyen's blood, which, are we seriously to believe that Dutch had harvested his body.

...also I think D'av beat up at least half a dozen other killjoys, possibly more. Hee. He and Dutch together really are a powerhouse.
musesfool: mal & zoe, out of gas (can't take the sky)
[personal profile] musesfool
Monday night, [personal profile] innie_darling and I met up to see the new Jake Gyllenhaal/Tatiana Maslany movie about the Boston Marathon bombing, Stronger. The acting was good, I thought. It was not the kind of movie I would have sought out on my own, but I was glad to have seen it.

While we were waiting for the movie to start, we were talking about fannish things as per usual, and about how I sometimes classify a pairing as "I don't not ship it" and in thinking about it more over the past couple of days, I came up with my own personal taxonomy of shipping:

- OTP OF OTPS (i.e., the all-time greats, ironclad, no matter what)
- OTP
- I ship it!
- I don't not ship it
- I could/might be convinced to ship it
- I don't care (i.e., if it shows up in a story that otherwise has things going for it, I'll keep reading, but I don't seek it out)
- meh, I don't ship it / it bores me so I don't read it
- I dislike it but whatever, other people can do what they like, I can scroll past
- NOTP (i.e., it's blocked so I don't have to sully my eyes with it)

Generally, when I talk about a pairing as as "I don't not ship it," I mean that they are people who are most definitely weird about each other, which is one of my personal flags for shipping, but in this particular classification, I don't care if they are having sex with each other or not (or with other people, depending), as long as they are somehow together – partners, brothers, whatever. I think (I hope!) it's implicit that I understand why people would ship them*, but I just...don't take that particular read on the relationship under most circumstances.

*as opposed to pairings where I don't.

And if they are having sex, I personally prefer it not to be framed romantically? Or, rather, in most cases, in terms of canon (rather than AU) settings, I don't find the usual shippy romantic tropes particularly interesting with these sorts of pairings. I mean, sure, 'there's only one bed' or fake dating are always on the table, but I don't feel like even those tropes should follow the regular narrative path. The clearest examples we came up with were Sam/Dean and Mal/Zoe, and I mean, I don't see either of those pairings as people who go on dates or have traditionally madcap rom com hijinks (which isn't to say that that couldn't be done with great results, but I don't think it could be played straight, as it were [I mean, Sam/Dean is incest, so it has its own challenges]). And she threw in Middleman/Wendy (which I do ship more traditionally), and I brought up Obi-Wan/Anakin, which is what I'm having complicated feelings about lately, and so it seems like a useful category to have. idk.

***

Introducing Randall Flagg

Sep. 21st, 2017 10:17 am
cyberghostface: (Right One 2)
[personal profile] cyberghostface posting in [community profile] scans_daily
 

Today is Stephen King's 70th birthday. To celebrate I figured I would post a few pages from Marvel's adaptation of The Stand showcasing Randall Flagg, who I think is one of King's greatest villains.

I'm a man of wealth and taste. )

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